Sunday, January 11, 2015

Single Title Romance

THE SCORE SHEET
~ ALL SPECIFIC SECTIONS

Most of the opinions on judging and interpreting the questions’ intent are my own words. I’ve only been in the business 15 years and have spoken to many authors, gathering information. A lot of the time when a question is asked, I go to authors who publish in that genre for advice. Please use your own expertise and experience, but keep our humble interpretations in mind. Thanks, Angi

~If you have an additional question regarding your specific category, please send it directly to GEcoordinator@ntrwa.org.

~Some of the explanations are the same for general questions which require some expected knowledge of the sub-genre. If you require a more in-depth definition of the genre...please send an email for additional information. Additional resources are being posted this week.


~For your convenience we’ve included a description of each category as described on our FINAL EDITORS page.

PLEASE NOTE: Single Title Romane judges received their entries Sun 1/11

*SINGLE TITLE  ROMANCE*
Romantic novels released as individual titles. An example is the 2014 RWA RITA winner: CRAZY THING CALLED LOVE by Molly O’Keefe.

SPECIFIC TO THE SINGLE TITLE CATEGORY
Possible 20 point total to award, 5 points per question
        Does the author build a sustainable plot that includes a romance essential to the story? (The potential of a romance should be shown in the entry.)
        Does the author capture the pacing of a single title romance with additional characters or plot twists?        
        Are the secondary characters necessary, interesting, and believable?
        Do the secondary characters have a believable subplot that will add to the main plot but not over-shadow the main plot?

Breaking Down the Questions
        Does the author build a sustainable plot that includes a romance essential to the story? (The potential of a romance should be shown in the entry.)
With the additional word count available to Single Title romances, one of the two protagonists may not be introduced. If this is the case, is there a hint or chance that the plot allows for a romance? We don’t want
        Does the author capture the pacing of a single title romance with additional characters or plot twists?         
Sometimes a single title begins with a single character. This question is all on the reader. Is there potential to carry an entire 80,000 word book. Here’s a simple rule: if the plot problem can be resolved with a conversation… it needs more complexity. Did the author provide it? Hint at it? Is the story different?
        Are the secondary characters necessary, interesting, and believable?
As with any length and any sub-genre of romance, the secondary characters must have a purpose in the scene. One point to watch out for is if they’re info-dumping. Now, a second character in the room is the perfect way to give the reader information without the POV character just thinking about it. Dialogue is always better (in my humble opinion). A dialogue (or mental note that the secondary character is talking a lot LOL) gives purpose and makes the character necessary.
        Do the secondary characters have a believable subplot that will add to the main plot but not over-shadow the main plot?
Without the aid of a manuscript synopsis, again, this question has to be decided by the potential in the first 5,000 words. Don’t be afraid to use your instincts. If you deduct points, please let the contestant know why. Your impressions of their story is part of the reason they entered our contest.

If you have specific questions regarding this section, please contact GEcoordinator@ntrwa.org.
Additional help tips for this category may be available through the coordinator or on our blog.


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