Monday, January 12, 2015

Contemporary Series Romance

THE SCORE SHEET
~ ALL SPECIFIC SECTIONS

Most of the opinions on judging and interpreting the questions’ intent are my own words. I’ve only been in the business 15 years and have spoken to many authors, gathering information. A lot of the time when a question is asked, I go to authors who publish in that genre for advice. Please use your own expertise and experience, but keep our humble interpretations in mind. Thanks, Angi

~If you have an additional question regarding your specific category, please send it directly to GEcoordinator@ntrwa.org.

~Some of the explanations are the same for general questions which require some expected knowledge of the sub-genre. If you require a more in-depth definition of the genre...please send an email for additional information. Additional resources are being posted this week.


~For your convenience we’ve included a description of each category as described on our FINAL EDITORS page.

*CONTEMPORARY SERIES ROMANCE*
Romantic series novels. If your manuscript is a series romantic suspense, you may enter the Contemporary Series category or the Romantic Suspense category. Please check our score sheets to see which benefits your writing. An example is the 2014 RWA RITA winner: WHY RESIST A REBEL? by Leah Ashton.

SPECIFIC TO THE CONTEMPORARY SERIES CATEGORY
Possible 20 point total to award, 5 points per question
        Are the protagonists’ introductions as individuals and possibly to one another occurring at a pace appropriate to a series romance? (Does not refer to the h/h first meet, but the actual character introductions.)
        Does the author successfully introduce a series type “hook” in a unique or original manner?          
        Does the author capture the tone of a series romance? (Plot concentrates on the main protagonists and isn’t distracted with too many subplots.)
        Does the author capture the pacing of a series romance?

Breaking Down the Questions
        Are the protagonists’ introductions as individuals and possibly to one another occurring at a pace appropriate to a series romance? (Does not refer to the h/h first meet, but the actual character introductions.)            
There is no rule that states the hero and heroine should physically meet in the first chapter. It is commonplace in Series romance that at least both characters are introduced. We’ve based our score sheet as if the reader would be introduced to both the hero and heroine in the first 5000 words. With the somewhat faster pace of the series romance, we would hope that the reader can obtain a sense of the characters and where the story is headed.
        Does the author successfully introduce a series type “hook” in a unique or original manner?         
Hooks or tropes.
        Does the author capture the tone of a series romance? (Plot concentrates on the main protagonists and isn’t distracted with too many subplots.)
Tone. If you don’t read several types of category romances, this question may be a mystery to you. Please contact the coordinator for help. But each type and length of a series romance has its own feel. It’s what a reader would expect when picking up a book not only on a designated/tagged bookshelf, but also by an author.
        Does the author capture the pacing of a series romance?
Series Romance normally has a faster pace than single title since the word count is often much less.  This pacing may not refer to action on the page. It might refer to less time spent addressing an issue. 
 
If you have specific questions regarding this section, please contact GEcoordinator@ntrwa.org.
Additional help tips for this category may be available through the coordinator or on our blog.

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